Protecting Local Authority to Adopt Local Solutions

In community-based prevention, researchers and professionals have realized that the best solution for one community may not be the same for another. The best solution to address problems in a community often comes from the folks most heavily impacted. Laws and policies adopted at the local level are key to improving health outcomes and reducing inequities because they are community specific solutions.

Addressing the Off-Campus Tobacco Retail Environment to Enhance Tobacco Free Colleges

With many local and state smokefree laws not covering college or university campuses, these institutions have had to work hard to create smokefree environments on campus for their students and staff. The hard work doesn’t have to end there. Considering the off-campus retail environment in tobacco control efforts can be the perfect next step to further protecting the health of college students and their communities.

2021 Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative-Applications Now Open!

CADCA’s Geographic Health Equity Alliance and Counter Tools are excited to announce the upcoming 2021 Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative for National Tobacco Control and National Comprehensive Cancer Control Programs. Applications are due by Friday, April 30, 2021.

Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative 2020 – Highlights from Tobacco Control Programs

Last year, the Geographic Health Equity Alliance and Counter Tools facilitated the inaugural Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative for National Comprehensive Cancer Control and National Tobacco Control Programs. This month, we are highlighting some geographic surveillance efforts by the national tobacco control programs of Florida, Georgia and Indiana.

Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative 2020 – Highlights from Cancer Control Programs

Last year, CADCA’s Geographic Health Equity Alliance (GHEA) and Counter Tools facilitated the inaugural Geographic Surveillance Learning Collaborative for National Comprehensive Cancer Control and National Tobacco Control Programs. This month, we are highlighting some geographic surveillance efforts by the comprehensive cancer control programs of Alaska, Iowa and Wisconsin.

Building Healthy Communities Through the Retail Environment

The retail environment provides many of the products that result in unhealthy behaviors (tobacco use, poor nutrition, excessive alcohol use). How can we create a retail environment where the healthy choice is the easy choice? Some important strategies involve addressing the availability, promotion and price of tobacco products, foods and beverages and alcohol in stores.

Tobacco Retailer Licensing Considerations for Rural Communities

In the United States, rates of tobacco use are higher in rural than urban populations, yet rural communities often lack the tobacco control policy coverage present in more urban areas. While there are several reasons why policy adoption may be more challenging in rural areas, some rural communities have found success with local-level tobacco control policies.

Reducing Tobacco Disparities with Minimum Floor Price Laws

According to the Surgeon General, raising the price of tobacco products is one of the most effective strategies for reducing initiation, decreasing consumption and increasing cessation. While excise taxes are a common strategy for increasing tobacco prices, minimum floor price laws are another promising non-tax strategy with the potential to reduce health disparities.

Secondhand Smoke Exposure: A Social Justice Issue

Many states and localities have adopted comprehensive smoke-free laws. However, there are over 58 million Americans still exposed to secondhand smoke today. A closer look at which communities are left unprotected reveals clear health inequities and points to a need for smoke-free protections for all as a strategy to advance social justice.

Place Matters for our Health, and Tobacco Retailers Play a Significant Part

Over the last few years, several corporate-owned chains and franchise stores have made commitments to reducing youth tobacco access. Conversely, other franchises have started selling tobacco, which has increased tobacco retailer density in some regions. These changes can have a significant impact on a community's tobacco retail market depending on the geographic location of that community. By: Elizabeth Gerndt, Counter Tools